Blog


RICE: FOOD FOR THOUGHT


Posted By on Sep 24, 2021

One of the keys to the Lowcountry’s 18th and 19 century economy was Rice. And the labor intensive cultivation of rice was a major factor in the growth of slavery in the area. Learn more this Saturday, 9/25, when Middleton Place presents “Rice and Slavery: The Connection That Made the Lowcountry. For more information CLICK HERE

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MORE ORAL HISTORY FROM BOB TUTEN


Posted By on Sep 23, 2021

You may be familiar with our initiative to capture Daniel Island’s history in the words and, eventually, the voices of the men and women who lived it. Our opening efforts are available at IN THEIR OWN WORDS. Our latest entry is, again, a reminiscence by Bob Tuten who moved to the island as a boy in the 1930s. To see Bob’s latest, Loaded for Bear, CLICK HERE. Bob Tuten and his great granddaughter Payton Kathleen Watson As...

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TOUR OF BATTERIES PRINGLE & TYNES


Posted By on Sep 23, 2021

IN DEFENSE OF CHARLESTON: A TOUR OF BATTERIES PRINGLE & TYNES WITHCHIEF OF COLLECTIONS JENNIFER McCORMICKSaturday, October 9 at 9:30 AMIn 1863 the Confederate earthworks, Batteries Pringle and Tynes, wereconstructed by enslaved people and soldiers to serve as part ofGeneral P.G.T. Beauregard’s “New Lines.” Hurriedly constructed, bothserved as part of the James Island defenses which protected Charlestonfrom...

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A peek behind the scenes is always fascinating….and the Charleston Museum is giving us that chance Thursday, September 16 Exclusive Storeroom Tour: Accessories Through Time with Curator of Historic Textiles Virginia Theerman   Thursday, September 16 at 3:30 PM   Join Curator of Historic Textiles Virginia Theerman for an exclusive in depth tour of the Museum’s accessories collection, focusing on shoes, purses, and fans,...

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Santee Canal Preservation


Posted By on Sep 13, 2021

There’s some welcome news for history preservation buffs in this week’s Daniel Island News. Lord Berkeley Conservation Trust Secures Conservation Easement Along Santee River and Historical Canal By: Staff Report “One of the last remaining sections of the 18th century Old Santee Canal and 645 acres of surrounding forestland including nearly two miles of Santee River frontage are now protected permanently. The Lord...

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